Gospel and Readings 17.10.2021

Twenty-ninth Sunday in Ordinary Time

Lectionary: 146

Reading I

The LORD was pleased
to crush him in infirmity.

If he gives his life as an offering for sin,
he shall see his descendants in a long life,
and the will of the LORD shall be accomplished through him.

Because of his affliction
he shall see the light in fullness
of days;
through his suffering, my servant shall justify many,
and their guilt he shall bear.

Responsorial Psalm

R. (22)    Lord, let your mercy be on us, as we place our trust in you.
Upright is the word of the LORD,
and all his works are trustworthy.
He loves justice and right;
of the kindness of the LORD the earth is full.
R. Lord, let your mercy be on us, as we place our trust in you.
See, the eyes of the LORD are upon those who fear him,
upon those who hope for his kindness,
To deliver them from death
and preserve them in spite of famine.
R. Lord, let your mercy be on us, as we place our trust in you.
Our soul waits for the LORD,
who is our help and our shield.
May your kindness, O LORD, be upon us
who have put our hope in you.
R. Lord, let your mercy be on us, as we place our trust in you.

Reading II

Brothers and sisters:
Since we have a great high priest who has passed through the heavens,
Jesus, the Son of God,
let us hold fast to our confession.
For we do not have a high priest
who is unable to sympathize with our weaknesses,
but one who has similarly been tested in every way,
yet without sin.
So let us confidently approach the throne of grace
to receive mercy and to find grace for timely help.

Alleluia

R. Alleluia, alleluia.
The Son of Man came to serve
and to give his life as a ransom for many.
R. Alleluia, alleluia.

James and John, the sons of Zebedee, came to Jesus and said to him,
“Teacher, we want you to do for us whatever we ask of you.”
He replied, “What do you wish me to do for you?”
They answered him, “Grant that in your glory
we may sit one at your right and the other at your left.”
Jesus said to them, “You do not know what you are asking.
Can you drink the cup that I drink
or be baptized with the baptism with which I am baptized?”
They said to him, “We can.”
Jesus said to them, “The cup that I drink, you will drink,
and with the baptism with which I am baptized, you will be baptized;
but to sit at my right or at my left is not mine to give
but is for those for whom it has been prepared.”
When the ten heard this, they became indignant at James and John.
Jesus summoned them and said to them,
“You know that those who are recognized as rulers over the Gentiles
lord it over them,
and their great ones make their authority over them felt.
But it shall not be so among you.
Rather, whoever wishes to be great among you will be your servant;
whoever wishes to be first among you will be the slave of all.
For the Son of Man did not come to be served
but to serve and to give his life as a ransom for many.”

OR:

Jesus summoned the twelve and said to them,
“You know that those who are recognized as rulers over the Gentiles
lord it over them,
and their great ones make their authority over them felt.
But it shall not be so among you.
Rather, whoever wishes to be great among you will be your servant;
whoever wishes to be first among you will be the slave of all.
For the Son of Man did not come to be served
but to serve and to give his life as a ransom for many.”

REFLECTION

From Catholic Daily Reflections.com

Jesus summoned the twelve and said to them, “You know that those who are recognized as rulers over the Gentiles lord it over them, and their great ones make their authority over them felt. But it shall not be so among you. Rather, whoever wishes to be great among you will be your servant; whoever wishes to be first among you will be the slave of all.”  Mark 10:42–44

This is certainly easier said than done.  This passage reveals one serious temptation that those “who are recognized as rulers” may fall into.  This is the temptation of an abuse of power and a lack of humble leadership.

For example, tradition states that at the heart of the fall of lucifer and the demons was a desire for power.  “I will not serve” are the words attributed to lucifer.  In other words, the desire for power and to be served by others was real and very powerful for these fallen angels.  So it is with each one of us.

Though we may not be in a position of great power over others, we will most likely all struggle with the desire for power.  This can happen in just about any context.  Take, for example, a friendship.  Very often when there is the slightest disagreement on something, we want our own way.  We want to be in charge.  Or take the example of home life.  How many enter into family life with a desire to serve the others and to humbly submit to the others’ wills?  This is hard to do.  It’s much easier to want to be the boss and to dictate to others what is to happen in this or that situation.

In the passage above, Jesus makes it clear to His Apostles that when they exercise their “authority” over others they are not to make it “felt” by others.  In other words, Jesus was not calling His Apostles to be leaders by brute force, intimidation, manipulation or by any other severe exercise of their authority.  The authority that Jesus wanted was much different.

Christian authority is centered in love and humility.  It’s a “leadership” that is lived in true humility.  This leadership wins over hearts, minds and wills of others and invites them to follow in charity and love.  This must happen within the family, among friends, at church and within society.

Reflect, today, upon how you lead others.  Do you expect to be the “boss” and expect others to follow you because of your authority?  Or do you lead others by humility and love drawing them to Christ through your goodness?  Commit yourself to Christian leadership as Jesus intended and you will be amazed at the effect it has within your family, among friends and within the larger community.

Lord, help me to be a humble leader.  Help me to let Your heart of love and mercy shine forth and to lead by the goodness and kindness of Your merciful heart.  Help me to set aside all pride and egotism and to become a servant of all.  Jesus, I trust in You.

Synod Prayer

Gospel and Readings 10.10.2021

Twenty-eighth Sunday in Ordinary Time

Lectionary: 143

Reading I

    I prayed, and prudence was given me;
I pleaded, and the spirit of wisdom came to me.
I preferred her to scepter and throne,
and deemed riches nothing in comparison with her,
nor did I liken any priceless gem to her;
because all gold, in view of her, is a little sand,
and before her, silver is to be accounted mire.
Beyond health and comeliness I loved her,
and I chose to have her rather than the light,
because the splendor of her never yields to sleep.
Yet all good things together came to me in her company,
and countless riches at her hands.

Responsorial Psalm

R. (14)    Fill us with your love, O Lord, and we will sing for joy!
Teach us to number our days aright,
that we may gain wisdom of heart.
Return, O LORD! How long?
Have pity on your servants!
R. Fill us with your love, O Lord, and we will sing for joy!
Fill us at daybreak with your kindness,
that we may shout for joy and gladness all our days.
Make us glad, for the days when you afflicted us,
for the years when we saw evil.
R. Fill us with your love, O Lord, and we will sing for joy!
Let your work be seen by your servants
and your glory by their children;
and may the gracious care of the LORD our God be ours;
prosper the work of our hands for us!
Prosper the work of our hands!
R. Fill us with your love, O Lord, and we will sing for joy!

Reading II

Brothers and sisters:
Indeed the word of God is living and effective,
sharper than any two-edged sword,
penetrating even between soul and spirit, joints and marrow,
and able to discern reflections and thoughts of the heart.
No creature is concealed from him,
but everything is naked and exposed to the eyes of him
to whom we must render an account.

Alleluia

R. Alleluia, alleluia.
Blessed are the poor in spirit,
for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.
R. Alleluia, alleluia.

As Jesus was setting out on a journey, a man ran up,
knelt down before him, and asked him,
“Good teacher, what must I do to inherit eternal life?”
Jesus answered him, “Why do you call me good?
No one is good but God alone.
You know the commandments: You shall not kill;
you shall not commit adultery;
you shall not steal;
you shall not bear false witness;
you shall not defraud;
honor your father and your mother
.”
He replied and said to him,
“Teacher, all of these I have observed from my youth.”
Jesus, looking at him, loved him and said to him,
“You are lacking in one thing.
Go, sell what you have, and give to the poor
and you will have treasure in heaven; then come, follow me.”
At that statement his face fell,
and he went away sad, for he had many possessions.

Jesus looked around and said to his disciples,
“How hard it is for those who have wealth
to enter the kingdom of God!”
The disciples were amazed at his words.
So Jesus again said to them in reply,
“Children, how hard it is to enter the kingdom of God!
It is easier for a camel to pass through the eye of a needle
than for one who is rich to enter the kingdom of God.”
They were exceedingly astonished and said among themselves,
“Then who can be saved?”
Jesus looked at them and said,
“For human beings it is impossible, but not for God.
All things are possible for God.”
Peter began to say to him,
“We have given up everything and followed you.”
Jesus said, “Amen, I say to you,
there is no one who has given up house or brothers or sisters
or mother or father or children or lands
for my sake and for the sake of the gospel
who will not receive a hundred times more now in this present age:
houses and brothers and sisters
and mothers and children and lands,
with persecutions, and eternal life in the age to come.”

OR:

As Jesus was setting out on a journey, a man ran up,
knelt down before him, and asked him,
“Good teacher, what must I do to inherit eternal life?”
Jesus answered him, “Why do you call me good?
No one is good but God alone.
You know the commandments: You shall not kill;
you shall not commit adultery;
you shall not steal;
you shall not bear false witness;
you shall not defraud;
honor your father and your mother.

He replied and said to him,
“Teacher, all of these I have observed from my youth.”
Jesus, looking at him, loved him and said to him,
“You are lacking in one thing.
Go, sell what you have, and give to the poor
and you will have treasure in heaven; then come, follow me.”
At that statement his face fell,
and he went away sad, for he had many possessions.

Jesus looked around and said to his disciples,
“How hard it is for those who have wealth
to enter the kingdom of God!”
The disciples were amazed at his words.
So Jesus again said to them in reply,
“Children, how hard it is to enter the kingdom of God!
It is easier for a camel to pass through the eye of a needle
than for one who is rich to enter the kingdom of God.”
They were exceedingly astonished and said among themselves,
“Then who can be saved?”
Jesus looked at them and said,
“For human beings it is impossible, but not for God.
All things are possible for God.”

REFLECTION

From Catholic Daily reflections.com

As Jesus was setting out on a journey, a man ran up, knelt down before him, and asked him, “Good teacher, what must I do to inherit eternal life?”  Mark 10:17

This story starts out looking quite good.  Here is a young man who is quite wealthy who comes to Jesus with a question grounded in faith.  By asking Jesus what He must do to inherit eternal life, this man most likely believed that Jesus had the answer.  And in his excitement, he wanted direction from Jesus.

Jesus tells him that he must keep the Commandments, to which the young man responds that he has observed them from his youth.  But then Jesus says something that this young man never expected Him to say.  He says, “You are lacking in one thing. Go, sell what you have, and give to the poor and you will have treasure in heaven; then come, follow me.”  Ouch!  This must have stung this rich young man in the heart.  The passage continues by stating that this young man walked away sad as a result of what Jesus said.

The young man started with good intentions, that is clear.  But good intentions are not enough.  Following Jesus and gaining eternal life is an all-consuming and radical commitment of every part of our lives.  It’s not enough to tell Jesus that we will keep the Commandments but that’s all.  Sure, that may get us into Purgatory, but what we should desire is Heaven!  So how do we obtain Heaven?

We only obtain Heaven through a life of perfection.  Yes, it’s true.  If we want Heaven, we must ultimately become perfect in every way.  Every worldly attachment must disappear, and every sin must be overcome.  Our good intentions must turn into a radical and total gift of self to Jesus, seeking Him and only Him.

The rich young man walked away sad because he failed to realize that Jesus’ invitation to him to give everything away was actually an act of love.  He did not understand that he would find happiness in this radical commitment to follow Christ.

Reflect, today, upon the radical call of Jesus in your life.  He wants every part of your life.  You may have good intentions of trying to be good, but are you willing to go all the way following Christ in a full and unlimited way?

Lord, I love You, and I want to love You more.  I want to love You with my whole being.  Help me to realize that following You requires a radical and complete gift of myself to You.  May I be ready and willing to let go of any attachment in life that keeps me from following You.  Jesus, I trust in You.

Jesus’ help

St. Faustina

Canonisation of Sister Faustina was ”best day” of Pope John Paul II’s life

Tuesday 5 October last was the feast of Saint Mary Faustina. Helena Kowalska was born in 1905 in Poland. She was accepted by the Congregation of the Sisters of Our Lady of Mercy, which she entered in 1925, taking her new name, Sister Faustina.

From 1931, Saint Faustina had several apparitions of Christ, through which He revealed His Divine Mercy. With the help of Father Michael Sopoćko the devotion to the Divine Mercy began. The famous image of Divine mercy was painted under the instruction of Saint Faustina and she wrote instructions for a Novena of the Divine Mercy, which was published in the final year of her life. She died on 5 October 1938.

Saint Faustina was beatified on 18 April 1993 and canonized on 30 April 2000 by Saint Pope John Paul II, who also established Divine Mercy Sunday as a feast day for the entire Church. The feast day falls on the Second Sunday of the Easter season. On that day, John Paul II declared, “This is the happiest day of my life.” Saint Pope John Paul II later died on the vigil of Divine Mercy Sunday, 2 April 2005.

In Ireland, Saint Faustina is widely venerated through devotion to the Divine Mercy. Her prayer of the Divine Mercy Chaplet holds a special place of devotion amongst the faithful, especially when praying for the sick and dying.

Gospel and Readings 3.10.21

Twenty-seventh Sunday in Ordinary Time

Lectionary: 140

Reading I

The LORD God said: “It is not good for the man to be alone.
I will make a suitable partner for him.”
So the LORD God formed out of the ground
various wild animals and various birds of the air,
and he brought them to the man to see what he would call them;
whatever the man called each of them would be its name.
The man gave names to all the cattle,
all the birds of the air, and all wild animals;
but none proved to be the suitable partner for the man.

So the LORD God cast a deep sleep on the man,
and while he was asleep,
he took out one of his ribs and closed up its place with flesh.
The LORD God then built up into a woman the rib
that he had taken from the man.
When he brought her to the man, the man said:
“This one, at last, is bone of my bones
and flesh of my flesh;
this one shall be called ‘woman, ‘
for out of ‘her man’ this one has been taken.”
That is why a man leaves his father and mother
and clings to his wife,
and the two of them become one flesh.

Responsorial Psalm

R. (cf. 5)  May the Lord bless us all the days of our lives.
Blessed are you who fear the LORD,
who walk in his ways!
For you shall eat the fruit of your handiwork;
blessed shall you be, and favored.
R. May the Lord bless us all the days of our lives.
Your wife shall be like a fruitful vine
in the recesses of your home;
your children like olive plants
around your table.
R. May the Lord bless us all the days of our lives.
Behold, thus is the man blessed
who fears the LORD.
The LORD bless you from Zion:
may you see the prosperity of Jerusalem
all the days of your life.
R. May the Lord bless us all the days of our lives.
May you see your children’s children.
Peace be upon Israel!
R. May the Lord bless us all the days of our lives.

Reading II

Brothers and sisters:
He “for a little while” was made “lower than the angels, ”
that by the grace of God he might taste death for everyone.

For it was fitting that he,
for whom and through whom all things exist,
in bringing many children to glory,
should make the leader to their salvation perfect through suffering.
He who consecrates and those who are being consecrated
all have one origin.
Therefore, he is not ashamed to call them “brothers.”

Alleluia

R. Alleluia, alleluia.
If we love one another, God remains in us
and his love is brought to perfection in us.
R. Alleluia, alleluia.

The Pharisees approached Jesus and asked,
“Is it lawful for a husband to divorce his wife?”
They were testing him.
He said to them in reply, “What did Moses command you?”
They replied,
“Moses permitted a husband to write a bill of divorce
and dismiss her.”
But Jesus told them,
“Because of the hardness of your hearts
he wrote you this commandment.
But from the beginning of creation, God made them male and female.
For this reason a man shall leave his father and mother
and be joined to his wife,
and the two shall become one flesh.

So they are no longer two but one flesh.
Therefore what God has joined together,
no human being must separate.”
In the house the disciples again questioned Jesus about this.
He said to them,
“Whoever divorces his wife and marries another
commits adultery against her;
and if she divorces her husband and marries another,
she commits adultery.”

And people were bringing children to him that he might touch them,
but the disciples rebuked them.
When Jesus saw this he became indignant and said to them,
“Let the children come to me;
do not prevent them, for the kingdom of God belongs to
such as these.
Amen, I say to you,
whoever does not accept the kingdom of God like a child
will not enter it.”
Then he embraced them and blessed them,
placing his hands on them.

OR:

The Pharisees approached Jesus and asked,
“Is it lawful for a husband to divorce his wife?”
They were testing him.
He said to them in reply, “What did Moses command you?”
They replied,
“Moses permitted a husband to write a bill of divorce
and dismiss her.”
But Jesus told them,
“Because of the hardness of your hearts
he wrote you this commandment.
But from the beginning of creation, God made them male and female.
For this reason a man shall leave his father and mother
and be joined to his wife,
and the two shall become one flesh.

So they are no longer two but one flesh.
Therefore what God has joined together,
no human being must separate.”
In the house the disciples again questioned Jesus about this.
He said to them,
“Whoever divorces his wife and marries another
commits adultery against her;
and if she divorces her husband and marries another,
she commits adultery.”

 

REFLECTION

from Catholic Daily reflections.com

 

But from the beginning of creation, God made them male and female. For this reason a man shall leave his father and mother and be joined to his wife, and the two shall become one flesh. So they are no longer two but one flesh. Therefore what God has joined together, no human being must separate.” Mark 10:6–9

Those three words, “From the beginning,” are key words for our day and age.  It is important for people of faith to recognize not only the supernatural gifts God has given us but also the natural gifts.  The supernatural gifts are all those gifts given us by the Cross of Christ.  His life, death and Resurrection poured forth upon us grace from Heaven and made holiness, salvation and Heaven possible.  But there is a whole other order of “gift” that God gave us that we often take for granted.  That’s the gift of nature.

Creation itself, the order of the Universe, our humanity and the natural design of God are all gifts.  Science can do much to discover the secrets and mysteries of the natural world, but ultimately a full understanding of even the natural world is mysterious, deep and awe-inspiring.

One aspect of the natural world God gave us is our sexuality.  “God made them male and female…”  This natural design is part of the glorious wisdom of the Creator and must be understood, loved and respected fully.  Being “male and female” is something that is quite obvious and naturally understood.  Within each person are certain attributes, desires, tendencies, etc., that go hand in hand with being either male or female.

In many ways, the uniqueness and complementarity of the sexes have been challenged and even disregarded at times, especially in our day and age.  But deep down we all understand that being male or female is part of who we are.  It makes up our very identity as a person and brings with it many blessings.  Femininity and masculinity, at times, also can become distorted and confused.  But in essence, these attributes of our personhood cannot be discarded or denied.  In fact, embracing who we are in our nature is nothing more than being honest and enables us to continue down the road of true natural integrity.

Reflect, today, upon the many ways that being “male and female” are natural blessings from God.  Reflect, also, upon the ways that these natural gifts are challenged and undermined in our world today.  Embrace who you are, embrace who God made you to be, and let that natural gift from God flourish in your life.

Lord, I thank You for Your countless gifts.  Thank You for the gift of grace won by Your Cross, and thank You also for the gift of nature and for the way You made me.  Help me to embrace my full identity in accord with Your design and, in that embrace, help me to continue to discover my very dignity.  Jesus, I trust in You.

October, month of the Holy Rosary

 

Gospel and Readings 26.9.21

Twenty-sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time

Lectionary: 137

Reading I

The LORD came down in the cloud and spoke to Moses.
Taking some of the spirit that was on Moses,
the LORD bestowed it on the seventy elders;
and as the spirit came to rest on them, they prophesied.

Now two men, one named Eldad and the other Medad,
were not in the gathering but had been left in the camp.
They too had been on the list, but had not gone out to the tent;
yet the spirit came to rest on them also,
and they prophesied in the camp.
So, when a young man quickly told Moses,
“Eldad and Medad are prophesying in the camp, ”
Joshua, son of Nun, who from his youth had been Moses’ aide, said,
“Moses, my lord, stop them.”
But Moses answered him,
“Are you jealous for my sake?
Would that all the people of the LORD were prophets!
Would that the LORD might bestow his spirit on them all!”

Responsorial Psalm

R. (9a)    The precepts of the Lord give joy to the heart.
The law of the LORD is perfect,
refreshing the soul;
the decree of the LORD is trustworthy,
giving wisdom to the simple.
R. The precepts of the Lord give joy to the heart.
The fear of the LORD is pure,
enduring forever;
the ordinances of the LORD are true,
all of them just.
R. The precepts of the Lord give joy to the heart.
Though your servant is careful of them,
very diligent in keeping them,
Yet who can detect failings?
Cleanse me from my unknown faults!
R. The precepts of the Lord give joy to the heart.
From wanton sin especially, restrain your servant;
let it not rule over me.
Then shall I be blameless and innocent
of serious sin.
R. The precepts of the Lord give joy to the heart.

Reading II

Come now, you rich, weep and wail over your impending miseries.
Your wealth has rotted away, your clothes have become moth-eaten,
your gold and silver have corroded,
and that corrosion will be a testimony against you;
it will devour your flesh like a fire.
You have stored up treasure for the last days.
Behold, the wages you withheld from the workers
who harvested your fields are crying aloud;
and the cries of the harvesters
have reached the ears of the Lord of hosts.
You have lived on earth in luxury and pleasure;
you have fattened your hearts for the day of slaughter.
You have condemned;
you have murdered the righteous one;
he offers you no resistance.

R. Alleluia, alleluia.
Your word, O Lord, is truth;
consecrate us in the truth.
R. Alleluia, alleluia.

At that time, John said to Jesus,
“Teacher, we saw someone driving out demons in your name,
and we tried to prevent him because he does not follow us.”
Jesus replied, “Do not prevent him.
There is no one who performs a mighty deed in my name
who can at the same time speak ill of me.
For whoever is not against us is for us.
Anyone who gives you a cup of water to drink
because you belong to Christ,
amen, I say to you, will surely not lose his reward.

“Whoever causes one of these little ones who believe in me to sin,
it would be better for him if a great millstone
were put around his neck
and he were thrown into the sea.
If your hand causes you to sin, cut it off.
It is better for you to enter into life maimed
than with two hands to go into Gehenna,
into the unquenchable fire.
And if your foot causes you to sin, cut if off.
It is better for you to enter into life crippled
than with two feet to be thrown into Gehenna.
And if your eye causes you to sin, pluck it out.
Better for you to enter into the kingdom of God with one eye
than with two eyes to be thrown into Gehenna,
where ‘their worm does not die, and the fire is not quenched.'”

REFLECTION

From Catholic Daily reflections.com

“Whoever causes one of these little ones who believe in me to sin, it would be better for him if a great millstone were put around his neck and he were thrown into the sea.   If your hand causes you to sin, cut it off. It is better for you to enter into life maimed than with two hands to go into Gehenna, into the unquenchable fire.”  Mark 9:42–43

Seriously?  Does Jesus really mean this literally?  Should we really cut off our hand if it causes us to sin?  He goes on to say that we should also cut off our foot and pluck out our eye if it causes us to sin.

Some of the early Church Fathers see this Scripture as a reference to our intimate friends.  The context of this passage is that we ought not lead others into scandal and sin.  In fact, it would be better if we had “a great millstone” put around our neck and were thrown into the sea than to cause another to sin.

Friends, especially close friends, are a blessing most of the time.  But they can also be a cause for sin.  If a good friend were to intentionally try to convince another friend to sin, this is a grave issue and is the heart of what Jesus is addressing.  What He’s saying is that if we have close friends who are intentionally and maliciously tempting us to turn from God, it’s better that we let go of that “friend” and cut him/her off.  The hand, foot or eye is a symbol of those friends who work hard to draw us to sin.  It’s better that these friendships end than to be drawn into Hell with them.  And if we are the “friend” drawing others to sin, it’s better for us to cut our friendship off with those we are tempting.

One thing this passage reveals is the powerful natural bond of friendship.  Friendship is a good thing.  And when you have a close friend, you find great consolation in knowing your friend is deeply committed to you and will always be there for you.  But every friendship must be continually evaluated in the light of faith and truth.  Sometimes friendships can get in the way of our faith in God and can be a powerful influence upon us in a negative way.  Of course, the opposite is also true.

Reflect, today, upon your friendships.  If you have a close and intimate friend in your life, reflect upon how you influence that person or how he/she influences you.  Make sure that Christ is the center and that faith always prevails in this natural bond.

Lord, I thank You for all friendships in my life.  I thank You for giving me people who care.  Help me to always be a good friend and to always examine my friendships in the light of faith.  Jesus, I trust in You.

Prayer to Padre Pio

As the feast day of Padre Pio happened during the week, we say a prayer to him asking for his continued  intercession:-

 

Prayer for the Intercession of St. Pio of Pietrelcina


Dear God, You generously blessed Your servant,
St. Pio of Pietrelcina,
with the gifts of the Spirit.
You marked his body with the five wounds
of Christ Crucified, as a powerful witness
to the saving Passion and Death of Your Son.
Endowed with the gift of discernment,
St. Pio labored endlessly in the confessional
for the salvation of souls.
With reverence and intense devotion
in the celebration of Mass,
he invited countless men and women
to a greater union with Jesus Christ
in the Sacrament of the Holy Eucharist.

Through the intercession of St. Pio of Pietrelcina,
I confidently beseech You to grant me
the grace of (here state your petition).

Glory be to the Father… (three times). Amen.

Reflection